Just Go to www…..

“Honey! Can you please Google again…. “

“But I just…”

 

“I know, I know…. but now try!!

Coffee brewing, bacon frying…. this is what my house sounds like around 10:00 am as my wife and I are keystroking the day away. Each generation has its familiar sounds. My grandparents had “Breakfast!!”, my parents “Can you hear me now?”, and finally my wife and I are at “How many page views”.

Remember when building a web page cost an arm and a leg? Or even being found on the web was considered a monumental step? That kind of thinking held true in 1998. You could get away with it until around 2008. As of 2009, more than a quarter of the globe made use of the internet. That’s a lot of content. Today’s virtual world is quite a crowded one, and if people can’t find your webpage then it might as well not exist. However, as the adage goes the three most important things in business are location, location, location.

Use someone else’s computer and Google your business name. Ideally you should be number one on the search, at the very least top three. If your website can’t be found then it will not help generate business for you. In all seriousness, the mere fact that you can’t be found in this day and age will actually hurt your bottom line.

If a tree falls in the forest and no one is around to hear it, did it actually make a sound? If your services can’t be found by Google then its akin to opening a store in the middle of the forest. Your ranking on their search engine is equivalent to the number of blocks your store is from Main Street. Venture too far and no one will find out.

How much effort have you put into building your online presence? How much dough have you shelled out in advertising? Google can find you for free, and their ranking is priceless.

Why spend on advertising when I’ve got the world’s best search engine working for me? Besides, my wife’s got this whole blog thing down to a science.

Pricing to stay in business

How much does a single donut at Dunkin Donuts cost?  Calling around to a few stores I received the following 4 answers: $0.50, $0.69, $0.99, or $1.29? Are the stores charging $1.29 overpriced? Are the stores offering it at $0.50 discounting too much? The answer is “yes, it depends”. This same question applies across the QSR spectrum.

A thorough analysis of all transactions and an understanding of the locations is required to best answer the question. Using economic principles with the results displaying graphically, a business owner can make a more informed decision.  By understanding the local demand through the use of data insights techniques, he can work to maximize marginal profits. Typically this improves bottom line profits by several percent.  In a world of compressing margins, knowing where you can and can’t pass higher commodity costs to the consumer could mean the difference between staying in and going out of business.

Flash Crash Aftermath

It’s been months since the flash crash that caused several major stocks to trade at values close to zero for a few minutes before returning to a more reasonable level. Since that time several mini flashes have occurred. And yet, no irrefutable proof exists to blame any one type of trader. Most importantly virtually no policy changes been enacted to prevent a repeat occurrence.

I contend no one type of trader is to blame, but rather all traders are to blame. When a $40+ stock is suddenly trading for less than a dollar, how does no one step up and offer 35? It’s equivalent to a company that sells 1 IPOD online every min to the highest bidder. If suddenly they started selling for $1, someone would step in and offer a “reasonable” price.

So the question is; why doesn’t this happen.

1) Black box trading programs which typically help make the market are deigned to shut down when massive swings occur to give a human the chance to override the program. Trading itself shuts down when this takes place, except that there are now secondary markets that don’t abide by these same rules.

2) Typical investors have stop losses in place. If they stock drops below a certain level they give the order to sell at any price. Usually this is the price they set but if there are no buyers in the market then they could sell for far less than intended.

3) The traditional market makers have vacated their usual roles. Black box programs have replaced them and reduced the overall cost of trading. The bid/ask spread is far smaller today than it was 10 years ago. They’ve left because they can’t make money.

Stopping these crashes from taking place doesn’t require placing blame on one of the 3 groups above. They are all to blame but each is doing what make rationale sense to them. What needs to take place is that when a listing exchange flips the breakers and halts trading all the secondary exchanges need to halt trading for at least the same amount of time, if not longer. What is needed is a chance for cooler, more logical heads to prevail.